Budget

KU Revenues and Expenses

This page provides an overview of the revenues and expenditures for the University of Kansas and is updated when the annual financial report is issued after the first of each year. The next update in early 2016 will provide FY 2015 figures.

KU receives funding from a variety of sources. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 2014, tuition and fees were the largest source or revenue, accounting for $272.2 million of KU’s overall $1.17 billion in annual revenue.

Grants and contracts were the second largest source of revenue, accounting for $271.8 million of KU’s FY 2014 budget, followed by state appropriations at $241.9 million.

Note: Only a portion of all support from KU Endowment is reflected in the chart below. Of the $117.4 million in support provided to the university by KU Endowment in FY 2013, $83.5 million was spent directly by KU Endowment on the university's behalf. The remainder is reflected below and in the university's financial statements.

KU's revenue sources

KU's FY 2014 Revenue Sources. (Total may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.)

Click here for explanations of the revenue categories.

In terms of KU’s expenses, the largest single category is student instruction, which accounted for $370.2 million of the FY 2014 budget – 32 percent of all expenditures for the year. Research was the second largest category at $257.4 million.

KU's expenses

KU's FY 2014 Expenses. (Total may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.)

Click here for explanations of the expense categories.

 

Savings and Efficiencies

The university is undertaking a multi-year streamlining of its administrative operations called Changing for Excellence. Savings from projects that range from renegotiation of supplier agreements to the merger of maintenance operations are already being realized.  These funds are being reinvested in KU’s teaching and research mission, such as through the hiring of 22 new faculty members. This will enable KU to further leverage the strategic investments being made by Kansas policymakers.

For progress reports on specific areas, visit cfe.ku.edu.
 

History

In 1999, the Kansas Legislature, the Kansas Board of Regents and the six state universities sought and achieved consensus on a new model to govern and operate Kansas universities, community colleges and technical schools. Senate Bill 345 provided for an increase in higher education funding with an requirement that all institutions covered by SB 345 will meet specified performance agreements to ensure higher education funding from the Kansas Legislature is efficiently spent.

Over the past 15 years, the amount from the State General Fund that the university receives has declined significantly. These charts show SGF funding levels on a per-student basis, in actual dollars and in inflation-adjusted dollars.

 

Budget Process

Every June, the Kansas Board of Regents compiles a unified budget request from all the Kansas institutions including the University of Kansas. The unified budget is then submitted to the next session of the Kansas Legislature as part of the governor's upcoming budget for the next fiscal year. Rather than each postsecondary institution being funded separately, the Kansas Legislature provides a block grant to the Kansas Board of Regents, which in turn distributes the money based on a formula and whether a specific institution is meeting its performance agreement.

For more information about the budget cycle, visit the KU Budget Office.

 


David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Let's talk weight, seriously. Christie Befort changes obesity conversation. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/tPifpXsPvy
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


Internationally recognized programs
Millions in grants and contracts for research
Generous financial support for students
Research projects that stretch to Antarctica, Greenland, and numerous points in between
Birthplace and home of Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology
A thriving field program that sends undergraduate and graduate students throughout the world
Industry recruiters who visit annually to hire KU Geology's graduating students