2012 State Relations testimonies

Wed, 03/07/2012
During testimony in Topeka, Chancellor Gray-Little updated state senators on the School of Engineering’s ongoing expansion to meet the needs of Kansas students and employers. She also outlined the university’s priorities for the Senate Ways & Means Committee’s Higher Education Subcommittee during her remarks to the panel.
Tue, 02/07/2012
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little testified to the House Education Budget Committee about KU’s aspirations for the future. She also discussed how Governor Brownback’s recommended budget would help advance KU’s mission of educating leaders, building healthy communities, and making discoveries that change the world.
Wed, 01/25/2012
Richard L. Johnson, Chief of Police at the University of Kansas Medical Center, testified in opposition to HB 2353, which would allow concealed weapons on university campuses. He said the bill would not increase safety and would hamper law enforcement’s ability to protect their campus communities, a position shared unanimously by university police chiefs in Kansas.
Wed, 01/25/2012
Dr. Roy Jensen testified to the House Appropriations and Senate Ways and Means committees on the University of Kansas Cancer Center’s progress in its drive for National Cancer Institute designation. He detailed the benefits that are already being seen by patients and Kansas as a result of the effort, such as access to clinical trials and treatments being offered closer to home through the Midwest Cancer Alliance.
Mon, 01/23/2012
Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies Steve Warren testified to the Kansas Senate Ways and Means Committee in support of SB 258, a bill that would make it easier for university researchers to launch start-up companies.
Mon, 01/23/2012
Jim Modig, director of KU’s Office of Design and Construction Management, testified to the House Education Budget Committee in favor of HB 2429, which would continue a state law that promotes more efficient construction of university building projects that don’t use state funds.

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