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The Health Education Initiative
 
Training doctors for KansasThe Health Education Initiative
 
Training doctors for KansaDr. Francisco Chacon trained at KUs

Dr. Francisco Chacon trained at KU

The Health Education Initiative

Training more doctors for Kansas

The University of Kansas School of Medicine is the only medical school in Kansas and a premier institution for training primary care and rural physicians. To meet the state’s growing need for doctors, the school in 2011 opened a new campus in Salina and expanded its Wichita campus.

Despite these efforts, Kansas still faces a crucial shortage of physicians. Meanwhile, KU’s health education facilities in Kansas City have reached capacity, meaning we can't train more doctors.

That's why KU is seeking support for our Health Education Initiative, which seeks to build a new Health Education Building in Kansas City so we can train more doctors for Kansas.

Kansas' doctor shortage

39th: Kansas' national rank in doctors per capita

89: Kansas counties designated by KDHE as primary care health care provider shortage areas

285: New physicians needed each year for Kansas to rise to the national average of physicians per capita by 2030

213: New physicians needed each year for Kansas to maintain its current level of physicians per capita by 2030

30%: Percent of current physicians will be lost to retirement and other attrition over the next 10 years

Fact sheets

Below are fact sheets related to the Health Education Initiative and the healthcare services KU provides across the state.


Health Education Initiative story ideas

KU has assembled dozens of news releases and story ideas to help Kansas media write about the Health Education Initiative and the state's physician shortage. Click here.

Small-Town Spotlights

David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Let's talk weight, seriously. Christie Befort changes obesity conversation. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/tPifpXsPvy
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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