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Submit KU News

A good news release is a concise, complete description that informs and invites interest.

Common News Release Topics

  • Upcoming public events, exhibits, etc.
  • Important staff changes
  • New programs
  • Changes in existing programs
  • Awards, achievements, and appointments
  • Research, ongoing or completed
  • Community outreach efforts
  • Exceptional students, faculty, and staff
  • Unique programs, skills, achievements, etc.

How to Submit Information

Always include your name and phone number so we can contact you.

Some Tips for Writing Press Releases

  • Keep releases short.
  • Write clearly, addressing who, what, where, why and when in the first two paragraphs.
  • Identify a contact person (with a daytime phone number) who can answer questions.
  • Date the release and include whether the material is for immediate use or for release at a later date.

Common Press Release Mistakes

  • Providing insufficient and inaccurate information. To be useful, releases must be complete, correct, and specific.
  • Omission of the name and phone number of someone editors can contact with questions.
  • Writing releases that are too long.
  • Submitting a release too late.

"Even on an ordinary Saturday, when I am pressed for time to complete the (at times) overwhelming amount of schoolwork I have, there are moments so extraordinary — like looking up at the sun through the mosaic of colored leaves on campus — that remind me why I love what I do and why I love KU." - Sam Henkin, first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Geography, University of Kansas #exploreKU

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The University of Kansas — Shaping those who shape the world Their feats are outstanding, extraordinary — even mythical. They are known as heroes. Discoverers. Innovators. Legends. But before they began shaping the world, they were each shaped themselves on a legendary Hill known as Mount Oread. And they all share one name that you should share too: Jayhawk. (See notable alumni at http://bit.ly/1qAGSaj)


Internationally recognized programs
Millions in grants and contracts for research
Generous financial support for students
Research projects that stretch to Antarctica, Greenland, and numerous points in between
Birthplace and home of Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology
A thriving field program that sends undergraduate and graduate students throughout the world
Industry recruiters who visit annually to hire KU Geology's graduating students